Dave Koz And Friends At Sea 2013 – Messina

Dave Koz & Friends are delighted to be able to cruise in style with you to Italy, Greece & Sicily. The 2013 Mediterranean line-up includes:

Your Host – Dave Koz, Special Guest – Michael McDonald, Mindi Adair, Gerald Albright, Peter White, Keiko Matsui, Jake Shimabukuro, Vincent Ingala and more to be announced.

September 22nd thru September 29th, 2013

Ports of Call: Rome, Messina, Sicily; Mykonos, Greece; Athens, Greece; Sorrento, Italy

This is a Unique opportunity to hang out with Dave and his friends. You don’t want to let this ship sail without you. For more information about the cruise visit http://www.davekozcruise.com.

The ship will depart on September 22, 2013 from Rome and return on September 29, 2013. Monday, September 23, 2013 the ship will arrive Messina.

Just three miles off the coast of southern Italy’s mainland is the port town of Messina on the island of Sicily. This bustling town has a complex history with roots in Greek mythology but, because of an earthquake in the early 1900s, it’s a relatively young city architecturally. Since the majority of the city has been rebuilt or refurbished within the last 100 years, you’ll find the town has an interesting blend of new architecture and old styles.

Messina was founded by the Greeks who named it Zancle which is connected to the word Scythe, in the ancient native tongue of the city, and was also the name of the legendary king, who built the harbour, whose name was said to be Zanclus. Following the Roman, Byzantine and Arab invasions, in the latter of which Messina was the last to submit to the Arab yoke, the Normans, Swabians and Angevins came to Sicily left their mark and were either conquered or fled the wrath of native Sicilians. Messina’s epoch of glory come with the rule of the Aragon dynasty, who made Messina the capital of the kingdom of Sicily and recognised its value and potential as a port.

Today the city is growing and developing along the coast, and due to the violent earthquakes that have struck the area on several occasions and areal damage and bombardment during the second world war, it is almost completely modern. Learning from past lessons, modern Messina is constructed with safety in mind. Streets are wide and buildings relatively low.

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